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17

May

Cooney Architects nominated at this year’s Building & Architecture of the Year Awards 2017.

  • By Cooney Architects

Cooney Architects are delighted to have been nominated for the ‘Building and Architect of the Year Awards 2017 in the following categories

Building of the Year – Leisure award (Dunganny GAA Centre),

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Building of the Year – Public award & Education Award (Hill Of Uisneach Visitor Centre)

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Building of the Year – Educational award (Campus Conference Centre)

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11

May

Working with an Architect – Your Home

  • By Cooney Architects

This article, Published in RIAI Website May, 2017 by RIAI, is really useful if choosing an architect.

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Whether you are planning to build your dream home or are extending and renovating your existing house, a registered architect has the qualifications, vision and experience to take you expertly through your building project.

An architect can also save you money on a project, as they will research viable alternatives and solutions to suit your budget. Whether you are planning a new corporate headquarters or are simply extending your home, a RIAI-registered architect has the qualifications, vision and experience to take you expertly through your building project.

What Architects Do
An architect does a lot more than just provide you with a design, they will help you set a viable brief and budget, guide you through the planning process, obtain quotes for the work, manage consultants like surveyors and engineers, monitor the budget and administer the construction contract.

An architect can also save you money on a project, as they will research viable alternatives and solutions to suit your budget.

Make sure you work with a Registered Architect
In Ireland, the title ‘architect’ is registered and a person cannot practise as an architect unless they are on the Register of Architects. The training and regulation of architects reflect society’s concern that buildings should be designed by a properly trained individual.

How do  I Find an Architect?
The RIAI provides on its website a search tool – the RIAI Practice Directory – that enables you to find a registered architect in your area. You can search the directory by practice name, by skill or simply by location.  If you cannot find a suitable RIAI architectural practice, please contact the RIAI by giving details of the project, address, location and the RIAI can provide a list of architects in your area.

How does it work? The project Stages 

Building Control Regulations
New Building Control Regulations come into force March 1st 2014.  The Government introduced new Building Control (Amendment) Regulations (BC(A)R) that set out new procedures for the control of building activity. The regulations apply to most building works (including new houses, house extensions over 40m2, and any building works which require a fire safety certificate) and may affect the cost of projects and their duration.

For more details read The Building Control (Amendment) Regulations, S.I.9 –  Client Guidance Note.PDF File (353 KB)

For more details on Opt Out for Domestic Projects click HERE.

Your Architect can provide you with specific advice in relation to your project. Prior to commencing a project, Building Owners are advised to read the BC(A)R Code of Practice for inspecting and Certifying Buildings and Works.PDF File

How much it will Cost?
Architects’ Fees

An architect’s fee depends on the requirements and complexity of each project and the scope of services required. Some architects will charge you on the basis of a percentage of the total project cost, others on a fixed price lump sum or on a time charge basis. Fees need to be agreed before a project begins.

Building Costs
The cost of your build will depend on a wide range of factors including house size, construction method, materials, finishes and site context. The RIAI have compiled some typicalbuilding costs – from new single and two-storey houses to house extensions.

The RIAI have published a new Consumer Guide for Domestic and Commercial Works to provide clients with guidance on building costs. The RIAI has compiled this guide using average costs for different building types under ‘Commercial Works’ and ‘Domestic Works’. The Cost Guidelines can be used as an accompaniment to the new RIAI Client / Architect Agreements.

Working with an architect will be the best investment you make and raise your project to new levels! 

Please download  working with architect brochure here:  WorkingWithArchitect_2017

09

May

President Higgins lights up Bealtine at the Hill of Uisneach, in Ireland’s Ancient East

  • By Cooney Architects

One of our projects, The Uisneach Visitors Centre, welcomed President Michael D. Higgins on Saturday night; after signing the Visitor’s Book he  joined several thousand people from throughout Ireland and overseas on The Hill, where he lit the annual Bealtaine fire. President Higgins becomes first leader in almost 1,000 years to light fire on The Hill of Uisneach.

President Higgins Lights Up Bealtine at Hill of Uisneach in Ireland’s Ancient East (3) (1) (1)

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Lt to Rt
Padraig Bracken (Building Contractor); Frank Cooney (Co-Architect / Project Manager); Marie McCormac (Failte Ireland); David Clarke (Promoter / Landowner); Angela Clarke (Promoter / Landowner);
President Higgins; Tom Farrell (Community Representative); Terence McCague (Westmeath County Council); Alan Hill (Project Advisor)

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President Michael D. Higgins & Manchán Magan

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08

May

New Waterford Greenway video takes viewers on a beautiful journey

  • By Cooney Architects

Waterford’s stunning scenery plays a starring role in a new video celebrating the Waterford Greenway, the longest off-road walking and cycling experience in Ireland.

Several famed Waterford natives appear throughout the video, including Ireland rugby captain Niamh Briggs, Fair City star Carrie Crowley, and celebrity chef Paul Flynn (and his dog, Sky).

Manager of Waterford senior hurlers, Derek McGrath also lends his support, along with coach Mark Cooney and players Kevin Moran, Ian O’Regan, Barry Coughlan, Austin Gleeson and Pauric Mahony.

 

The video, released today to showcase the recently launched 46km trail, follows the adventures of 12-year-olds Patrick Brennan and Chloe Walsh, who set off from Waterford City and the coastal town of Dungarvan. The pair meet at Kilmacthomas, the half-way point on the Waterford Greenway.

Almost 200 people came together for the closing shot on the 50-metre high Kilmacthomas Viaduct, including performers and creations from Waterford performing arts theatre company, Spraoi.

Director of Services at Waterford City & County Council, Lar Power thanked those involved in the creation of the video.

“This was a real community effort and showcases what Waterford Greenway has to offer. So many Waterford people have got behind the promotion of the Greenway and we appreciate that support,” he said.

“It’s vital that everyone in Waterford becomes an ambassador – not just for the Greenway, but for all of the wonderful attractions and activities that can be experienced in Waterford.”

Also making an appearance in the video are cyclists from Dungarvan Cycling Club, and local stalwarts Tom and Helen O’Mahony of O’Mahony’s at Shanacool.

Dungarvan brand design agency, TOTEM, directed the video, while the videographer was Dominique Davoust, and drone work was by Colin Shanahan of DigiCol.

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For further information see www.visitwaterfordgreenway.com. Follow the Waterford Greenway on FacebookTwitter and Instagram and use the hashtag #WaterfordGreenway and #BeautifulJourney

 

28

Apr

Building Regulations-Technical Guidance Document: Part L, 2011 Conservation of Fuel & Energy – Dwellings by Frank Cooney

  • By Cooney Architects

Frank Cooney gave a presentation on ‘Building Regulations-Technical Guidance Document: Part L, 2011 Conservation of Fuel & Energy – Dwellings’ in at the RIAI SKILLNET CPD ROAD SHOW: PART L 2011 in Dublin, Cork and Galway.

Please download presentation slides

Cooney Architects Part L PP

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25

Apr

The Challenge of Retro-fitting Public Buildings…Why Retrofit? by Frank Cooney

  • By Cooney Architects

Frank Cooney gave a presentation on ‘The Challenge of Retro-fitting Public Buildings…Why Retrofit?’  in CMG Retro-fitting Conference 2012.

Please download presentation slides 2012-CMG-Final

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20

Apr

The Importance of a Business Plan by Frank Cooney

  • By Cooney Architects

Frank Cooney gave a presentation on The Importance of a Business Plan to the GreenBug (Green Builders Users Group) in 2011.

Please download presentation slides 2011-Greenbug

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18

Apr

Tour de Bristol

  • By Cooney Architects

Cooney Architects directors Patricia McCaffrey and Frank Cooney took part in the Tour De Bristol two weeks ago, in aid of St. Peters Hospice.IMG_9873

 

17

Apr

Sustainability by Frank Cooney

  • By Cooney Architects

Frank Cooney gave a presentation on sustainability to Aer Rianta International cpt. in 2011.

Please download presenation slides 2011 aer rianta

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12

Apr

How to make all-natural Easter egg dyes

  • By Cooney Architects

Published in www.treehugger.com on 31st  March, 2017 by Katherine Martinko (@feistyredhair)

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Who needs an overpriced kit with synthetic color tablets when you’ve already got colorful ingredients in your kitchen?

Long before overpriced, bunny-covered boxes of Easter egg dyes enticed every child walking into a supermarket in late spring, people colored eggs with ordinary ingredients found in any kitchen. It’s easier than you think. All you do is boil some richly pigmented foods in water, add vinegar and salt, and let white hard-boiled eggs soak. You’ll end up with beautiful colors that cost much less than a kit, make good use of food scraps that might otherwise go to waste, and be able to eat the finished product – something you should never do with conventionally dyed eggs.

You can use cooled hardboiled eggs, but these should stay in the fridge after dyeing if you plan to eat them. Alternatively, you can pierce a hole at either end and blow out the contents; make scrambled eggs and use the shells, though you must be careful because they’re fragile. You can also dye raw eggs. Over time, the yolk inside will shrivel up and you’ll be able to hear a faint rattle when you shake it, but this takes months. Decorated raw eggs will not smell unless they’re broken before the insides dry out. This is the method I always use when making Ukrainian eggs each year.

The dyeing formula stays roughly the same, no matter what you use: 2 cups of water for every 1 cup of chopped vegetable or fruit. If using turmeric, add 6 tbsp to the same amount of water. Boil the vegetable for 20 minutes, add 1 tbsp each of white vinegar and salt, then submerge the egg.

Natural dyes don’t work as quickly as synthetic colors, so you have to be patient. As The Globe and Mail said in a 2012 article on this topic, “The instant-gratification factor of this craft is low,” so it may be challenging for young kids. The longer you leave it, the darker it will be. Overnight may be a good idea.

Blue-Turquoise: Chopped purple cabbage
Purple: A cheap red wine or grape juice, undiluted
Pink: Beets and peels, frozen cherries or raspberries, pomegranate juice (undiluted)
Yellow: Turmeric powder or shredded turmeric root for brighter color; simmered orange peels for lighter shade
Red-Orange: Paprika or chopped carrots, chili powder for a browner hue
Green-Blue: Boil green cabbage, then add some turmeric.
Bluish-Grey: Frozen blueberries
Brown-Gold: Simmer 2 tbsp dill seeds in a cup of water and strain before use, or use strong coffee.
Green: Spinach or parsley

Make the eggs prettier by wrapping in elastic bands or drawing on them with a wax crayon or birthday candle before dyeing. (That’s the idea behind Ukrainian pysanky, where wax designs cover different layers of color and then are melted off by holding over a candle.) Make a mottled texture by dabbing with a sponge. Shine dry eggs with coconut oil.

For original article please click this link: http://www.treehugger.com/green-home/make-natural-dyes-beautifully-colored-easter-eggs.html